LGBTQIA+ Wiki
LGBTQIA+ Wiki
(okay adding some stuff on two-spirit and removing excess links)
 
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{{Infobox
 
{{Infobox
| image =Transgender Flag.png
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| image = Agender pride flag.svg
 
| caption =
 
| caption =
  +
| altname = <!-- In case the article's topic is known under multiple names, differentiate with a comma. -->
| altname = Trans
 
| term =
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| term = Gender
| spectrum =
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| spectrum = [[Transgender]] / [[Non-binary]]
| gender = Any
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| gender = None
 
| attracted = <!-- Indicate the gender(s) that the identifier is attracted to. -->
 
| attracted = <!-- Indicate the gender(s) that the identifier is attracted to. -->
 
| attractedtype = <!-- Indicate types of attraction people identifying as such may feel. Differentiate by using a comma -->
 
| attractedtype = <!-- Indicate types of attraction people identifying as such may feel. Differentiate by using a comma -->
 
| romance = <!-- Indicate the affiliated romanticism that is related to the sexuality -->
 
| romance = <!-- Indicate the affiliated romanticism that is related to the sexuality -->
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| sexuality = <!-- Indicate the affiliated sexuality that is related to the romantic orientation -->
| different = * [[Intersex]]
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| different = * [[Genderless]]
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* [[Gender neutral]]
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* [[Gender non-conforming]]
 
* [[Non-binary]]
 
* [[Non-binary]]
 
}}
 
}}
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'''Agender''' people are people who do not identify as any [[gender]],<ref name="WebMD: Agender">{{Cite web |url=https://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/what-does-genderqueer-mean|title=What Does Genderqueer Mean?|work=[https://www.webmd.com WebMD]|archivedate=20211026202859}}</ref><ref name="Verywell Mind: Gender Identity Terms">{{Cite web|url=https://www.verywellmind.com/glossary-of-must-know-gender-identity-terms-5186274|title=Glossary of Must-Know Gender Identity Terms|author=Cuncic, Arlin |work=[https://www.verywellmind.com Verywell Mind]}}</ref> though some define their gender experience more as being neither a man nor a woman. Whether or not the term applies is a personal decision and experience, as being agender is not the same experience for everyone identifying as such.<ref name="Healthline: What Does It Mean to Be Agender?">{{Cite web |url=https://www.healthline.com/health/agender|title=What Does It Mean to Be Agender?|author=Ferguson, Sian|work=[https://www.healthline.com Healthline]}}</ref> While agender is typically placed on the [[transgender]] and [[non-binary]] [[Umbrella term|umbrella]], this does not mean that all agender people also identify with either of those terms or necessarily transition physicially, legally, or socially.<ref name="TLP: Non-Binary">{{Cite_web|url=https://translanguageprimer.com/non-binary|title=Non-Binary|author=[[The Trans Language Primer]]|work=[https://translanguageprimer.com The Trans Language Primer]|archivedate=20211026211648}}</ref> Agender people can have any type of [[gender expression]], and use any set of [[pronouns]] or no pronouns at all.<ref name="UNCO: Pride Flags">{{Cite web|url=https://www.unco.edu/gender-sexuality-resource-center/resources/pride-flags.aspx|title=Pride Flags|author=The Gender & Sexuality Resource Center|work=[https://www.unco.edu University of Northern Colorado]}}</ref> One's agender identity is not specific, or generally related to [[sexual orientation]] or [[Birth assignment|assigned gender at birth]].<ref name="Healthline: What Does It Mean to Be Agender?" />
'''Transgender''', often shortened to '''trans''', is an [[umbrella term]] that describes an individual whose [[gender identity]] differs from their [[Birth assignment|assigned gender at birth]] (AGAB).<ref name="GLAAD Glossary: Transgender">{{Cite_web|url=https://www.glaad.org/reference/transgender|title=Glossary of Terms - Transgender|author=[[GLAAD]]|work=[https://www.glaad.org/reference GLAAD Media Reference Guide - 10th Edition]|archivedate=20211022144303}}</ref> Infants are assigned a [[sex]]<ref name="TLP: Birth Assignment">{{Cite_web|url=https://translanguageprimer.com/birth-assignment|title=Birth Assignment|author=[[The Trans Language Primer]]|work=[https://translanguageprimer.com The Trans Language Primer]|archivedate=20211101113949}}</ref> that is recorded on their birth certificate,<ref name="GLAAD Glossary: Transgender" /> and is usually based only on the appearance of their external genitalia. The birth assignment—generally defaulting to assigned male at birth (AMAB) or assigned female at birth (AFAB)—assumes that the individual's gender identity will correspond to the sex they were assigned.<ref name="TLP: Birth Assignment" /> A person's gender identity—their sense of their own gender—usually develops when they are very young. The realization that their gender is different from what they were assigned can occur as early as three years old or in childhood prior to the onset of puberty. It may also happen later in life.<ref name="Nonbinary Gender Identities">{{Cite_print|author=McNabb, Charlie|title=Nonbinary Gender Identities: History, Culture, Resources|publisher=Rowman & Littlefield|date=2018|ISBN==9781442275522}}</ref>
 
 
Transgender people can be binary{{#tag:ref|"Binary gender" refers to "man" or "woman".|group = note}} or [[non-binary]]{{#tag:ref|[[Non-binary]] is an [[umbrella term]] for [[gender]]s that are not exclusively man or woman.|group = note}}. Some transgender individuals may experience at least one form of [[gender dysphoria]] during their life, usually manifesting as an intense distress with their assigned gender. However, this is not universal, and not experiencing dysphoria does not mean someone is not transgender. Conversely, some transgender individuals may experience what is know as gender euphoria, a term used to describe a "positive and exciting feeling of one's gendered self".<ref name="TH">{{Cite web|url=https://www.transhub.org.au/dysphoria|title=Dysphoria = Trans Hub|publisher=Trans Hub|date=2021|accessdate=January 21, 2022}}</ref> Transgender people may or may not [[transition]] socially and/or physically from their assigned gender to their actual gender identity, the reason for which being their own.<ref name="Nonbinary Gender Identities" />
 
   
 
==Etymology==
 
==Etymology==
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The term "agender" is comprised of the prefix "a-", which comes from the Ancient Greek ''ἀ''-, meaning "not" or "without",<ref name="Wiktionary: a-">[https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/a-#Etymology Etymology of "a-"]</ref> and "gender". The literal meaning of the term agender is thus "without a gender".
The term transgender came into use as an umbrella term during 1971 to make a distinction between [[Sexual orientation|sexuality]] and [[gender identity]].<ref>{{Cite_web|url=https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2010/jun/02/brief-history-transgender-issues|title=Brief History of Transgender Issues|author=The Guardian, Professor Stephen Whittle}}</ref> Transgender is a combination of the prefix ''trans''—meaning "across, beyond, through, to change"—and the noun ''[[gender]],'' creating an adjective that highlights the journey and/or change with one's gender identity.<ref>https://www.etymonline.com/word/transgender#etymonline_v_39471</ref> The use of "transgender" rather than previous terminology increased in the early 1990s to emphasize gender rather than sex and to reject describing all trans people based on medical and psychological criteria.<ref name="Nonbinary Gender Identities" />
 
   
 
==Community==
 
==Community==
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Agender Pride Day is observed each year on May 19, with the first time having been in 2017. As such, it is one of the newer LGBTQIA+ awareness days.<ref name="The Gay Uk: When is Agender Pride Day in 2021?">{{Cite web |url=https://www.thegayuk.com/when-is-agender-pride-day-in-2021/ |title=When is Agender Pride Day in 2021? |author=News Desk |work=[https://www.thegayuk.com/ The Gay UK] |date=2021-02-24}}</ref>
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===History===
 
===History===
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While agender as an identity is not new, the word describing the gender experience, or lack thereof, only surfaced on the internet in 2000 on a forum called UseNet during a religious discussion with someone referring to God as being agender.<ref name="Them: What Does It Mean to Be Agender?">{{Cite web|url=https://www.them.us/story/inqueery-agender |title=Inqueery: What Does It Mean to Be Agender? |work=[https://www.them.us them.] |date=2018-08-07}}</ref> According to the Oxford English Dictionary, the term was used again on the same forum 5 years later, this time to refer to people,<ref name="OED: Agender">{{Cite_web|url=https://www.oed.com/view/Entry/47450702|title=agender, adj.|author=Oxford English Dictionary}}</ref> and from then on, the term started to gain traction. It was used in a profile done by the New York Times of "Generation LGBTQIA",<ref name="NYT: Generation LGBTQIA">{{Cite web|url=https://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/10/fashion/generation-lgbtqia.html |title=Generation LGBTQIA |author=Schulman, Michael |work=[https://www.nytimes.com New York Time] |date=2013-01-09}}</ref> and US history was made on March 10, 2017, when the Multnomah County Court of Oregon granted Patch a "General Judgment of Name and Sex Change", thus becoming the first, legally agender person in the US. The same judgment also allowed them to change names and become mononymous — meaning only having one name instead of a given name and a surname.<ref name="nbcnews">{{Cite web|url=https://www.nbcnews.com/feature/nbc-out/judge-grants-oregon-resident-right-be-genderless-n736971 |title=Judge Grants Oregon Resident the Right to Be Genderless |author=O'Hara, Mary Emily |work=[https://www.nbcnews.com NBC News] |date=2017-03-23}}</ref>
Gender is perceived and [[Gender expression|expressed]] differently depending on culture, thus experiences with gender akin to being transgender exist under many different names. Even though the use of the term transgender is recent, there have always been individuals expressing their gender differently from their sex.<ref name="What is Trans History?">{{Cite_web|url=https://www.historians.org/publications-and-directories/perspectives-on-history/may-2018/what-is-trans-history-from-activist-and-academic-roots-a-field-takes-shape|title=What is Trans History?|author=Agarwal, Kritika|date=2018-05-01}}</ref>
 
   
 
===Flag===
Mary Jones is one of the earliest records of [[trans feminine]] individuals in US History. She was a sex worker who was charged with grand larceny in 1836. When she was subjected to a strip search, it was discovered she was assigned male at birth. She arrived to court wearing [[feminine]] attire and a wig, boldly explaining before a courtroom—which vilified her for her skin color and [[gender presentation]]—that she always presented that way and would not change.<ref>[[Wikipedia:Mary Jones (trans woman)|Mary Jones (trans woman)]] on Wikipedia</ref>
 
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The agender flag was created on February 18, 2014, by Salem, who identifies as an agender and panromantic demisexual with they/she pronouns.<ref name="flagcreator">{{Cite web|url=https://majesticmess.com/encyclopedia/agender-flag/ |title=Agender Flag |work=[https://majesticmess.com/ Majestic Mess Designs]}}</ref> An artist from New York, they created the flag at a time when Tumblr was seeing an influx of identity expressions, making it hard for people to distinguish the valid identities from the "online fads". Capitalizing on the momentem, Salem created the agender flag (among others)<ref name="flagcreatorinterview">{{Cite web|url=https://majesticmess.com/2018/12/16/interview-creator-of-the-agender-flag/ |title=Introduction Interview: Creator of the Agender Flag |work=[https://majesticmess.com/ Majestic Mess Designs] |date=2018-12-16}}</ref> to increase visibility for agender identities and reclaim their own identity.<ref name="flagcreator" /> The transgender flag served as a primary influence as Salem wanted to have a similar stripe pattern and symmetry.<ref name="flagcreatorinterview" />
   
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[[File:Agender pride flag.svg|thumb|right|200px|This flag was created to increase visibility for agender people, as well as a way for the artist to reclaim their own identity.]]
We'wha was a Lhamana individual who lived from 1849 to 1896. In Zuni culture, Lhamana individuals were born male but often presented femininely and took on the same responsibilities as women. We'wha studied crafts associated with women, such as pottery for ceremonial purposes and skills associated with men, like weaving. Their skills as a craftsperson became renowned, forming them into a Cultural Ambassador for the Zuni people.<ref>{{Cite_web|url=https://www.womenshistory.org/education-resources/biographies/wewha|title=We'wha|author=Brandman, Mariana|partialdate=June 2021|work=[https://www.womenshistory.org National Women's History Museum]}}</ref>
 
   
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The flag design features 7 horizontal stripes, from top to bottom: black, gray, white, green, white, gray, and black again. The black and white stripes represent the agender experience, the gray the demi-agender experience, and the green refers to agender being part of the wider non-binary community as those who identify outside of the [[gender binary]].<ref name="TLP: Non-Binary" /> While the monochrome on the flag is representative of a spectrum of internatl identities, ranging from people with a strong feeling of gender to those without, the green in the middle was deliberately chosen for being the invert of the shade of purple on the non-binary flag that refers to those who relate to the gender binary, as purple is a combination of pink and blue, the traditional female and male colors, thus highlighting that agender does not fall between the binary spectrum at all.<ref name="flagcreatorinterview" />
[[Hijra]] individuals are recognized as a [[third gender]] in Hindu society and are recorded in the holy texts of the Ramayana and the Mahabharata, which date back to as early as 4th and 5th century. Hijra individuals are assigned male or [[intersex]] at birth and dress traditionally feminine. They leave home young to join a Hijra community to learn how to perform blessings for births and weddings.<ref>{{Cite_web|url=https://rpl.hds.harvard.edu/religion-context/case-studies/gender/third-gender-and-hijras|title=The third gender and Hijras|author=Rhude, Kristofer|partialdate=2018|work=[https://hds.harvard.edu/ Harvard Divinity School]}}</ref> Before British colonization, hijra individuals held powerful political positions in Sultanate and Mughal courts with responsibilities such as collecting taxes.<ref>{{Cite_web|url=https://blogs.lse.ac.uk/gender/2019/06/17/hijras-and-the-legacy-of-british-colonial-rule-in-india|title=Hijras and the legacy of British colonial rule in India|author=Hunter, Sophie|date=2019-06-17|work=[https://blogs.lse.ac.uk/gender Engenderings]|publisher=[https://www.lse.ac.uk/Gender London School of Economics: Department of Gender Studies]}}</ref>
 
   
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[[File:Agender pride flag 4 stripes.svg|thumb|left|An hommage to the original flag was created in 2021.]]
===Flag===
 
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While Salem's design remains the most widespread, more agender flags were created. In 2021, Mars created a four-striped homage to the original, using similar colors and meanings, though with a deliberately higher-contrast design and fewer stripes to emphasize the solidarity of agender people who may also be [[lesbian]], [[gay]], [[bisexual]], non-binary, trans, [[asexual|ace]], or any of the other sexual identities. By reducing the repetition of the colors, Mars sent out the message that "No matter what else we are, all agender people are wholly equally agender."<ref name="flag">[https://www.prideflags.org/ Agender pride flag 2021]</ref>
[[File:Transgender Flag.png|right|200px]]
 
Monica Helms designed the Transgender Pride Flag in August, 1999 and debuted it in 2000 at a Phoenix, Arizona, USA [[Pride]] parade. It consists of five horizontal stripes, two stripes are blue with each at the top and bottom, two pink stripes directly follow the blue with one white stripe in the center. The stripes are ordered this way so that the flag can be flown correctly in any direction, metaphoric for trans individuals finding correctness in oneself. The colors encompass the sprectrum of trans experiences. The blue represents masculinity, pink represents femininity, and white represents those who are transitioning, [[gender neutral]], [[gender non-conforming]], or [[non-binary]].<ref name="Wikipedia">[[Wikipedia:Transgender flag#Helms' design|Transgender flag]] on Wikipedia</ref>
 
   
 
===Distinction===
 
===Distinction===
====Non-binary====
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====Genderless====
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Genderless and agender are often presented as synonyms,<ref name="Healthline: What Does It Mean to Be Agender?" /><ref name="Canada glossary">{{Cite_web|url=https://www.btb.termiumplus.gc.ca/publications/diversite-diversity-eng.html|title=Gender and sexual diversity glossary|author=Translation Bureau|publisher=[https://www.canada.ca/home.html Government of Canada]|archivedate=20210618171114}}</ref> and while there is a strong overlap between the experiences, they are distinct terms because genderless puts a much stronger emphasis on the gender experience being one of completely lacking a gender. As with agender people, whether or not genderless people choose to transition in any way&mdash;physically, legally, or socially&mdash;is entirely dependent on their own experience.<ref name="TLP: Genderless">{{Cite web|url=https://translanguageprimer.com/genderless/ |title=Genderless|author=[[The Trans Language Primer]]|work=[https://translanguageprimer.com The Trans Language Primer]|archivedate=20211101171852}}</ref><ref name="TLP: GNC">{{Cite web|url=https://translanguageprimer.com/gender-non-conforming/|title=Gender Non-Conforming (GNC)|author=[[The Trans Language Primer]]|work=[https://translanguageprimer.com The Trans Language Primer]|archivedate=20211104012233}}</ref>
{{Main|Non-binary}}
 
Non-binary identities are included under the transgender umbrella term as they are people whose gender differs from what they were assigned at birth. However, the two identities are distinct, and people can identify as both trans and non-binary. A binary transgender person differs from their birth assignment by identifying as a man or a woman rather than female or male. A non-binary person may never identify with either binary term, or they may partially identify with either or both terms, which can include their birth assignment. A trans non-binary person is thus someone who both does not identify with their birth assignment (trans) and has a gender identity that is neither exclusively man nor woman (non-binary). Not all non-binary people identify as trans and not all trans people identify as non-binary.<ref name="Nonbinary Gender Identities" />
 
   
====Intersex====
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====Gender neutral====
{{Main|Intersex}}
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{{Main|Gender neutral}}
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Gender neutral means "not gendered", which places it right within the meaning of agender, i.e. "without a gender". However, as opposed to agender, gender neutral is not a term used to describe people. This term is used to refer to language (such as pronouns or neutral greeting or job titles), locations (like bathrooms), or other aspects of society.<ref name="PFLAG: National Glossary of Terms">{{Cite_web|url=https://pflag.org/glossary|title=National Glossary of Terms|author=[[PFLAG]]}}</ref>
Intersex is an umbrella term used for a variety of situations in which a person is born with sexual or reproductive anatomy that does not fit the typical binary of a male or female body. These differences include hormonal variations, chromosomal differences, and differentiation in sexual anatomy (including external and internal reproductive organs).<ref name="Planned Parenthood: Intersex>{{Cite_web|url=https://www.plannedparenthood.org/learn/gender-identity/sex-gender-identity/whats-intersex |title=What's intersex? |author=Planned Parenthood |archivedate=20220120104558 |work=https://www.plannedparenthood.org}}</ref><ref name="InterAct Advocates">{{Cite_web|url=https://interactadvocates.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/LavLaw-Trans-and-Intersex-Fact-Sheet.pdf|title=Understanding Intersex and Transgender Communities |archivedate=20211228035729 |author=InterAct Advocates}}</ref>
 
   
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====Gender non-conforming====
Intersex people are not inherently transgender, as the term denotes sex traits and anatomical, hormonal or chromosomal differences that a person was born with. However, a person who is intersex might identify as transgender alongside their intersex identity if they identify as a gender different what they were assigned at birth. One cannot "transition" to being intersex as it describes a difference in reproductive anatomy that has existed since birth, as opposed to a person who is trans having a gender that is different from their assigned gender at birth.<ref name="InterAct Advocates" />
 
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{{Main|Gender non-conforming}}
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The difference between agender and [[gender non-conforming]] people lies in the fact that agender people generally experience a lack of gender whereas a gender non-conforming person is someone who does not (fully) conforms to the expectations around their gender that their society enforces. While some gender non-conforming people may identify as agender, many do not, and they simply do no follow the expected gender norms. This can out itself in the way they express themselves, the roles they assume, or any other aspect of their gender.<ref name="Healthline: What Does It Mean to Be Agender?" />
   
====Two Spirit====
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====Non-binary====
 
{{Main|Non-binary}}
Two Spirit is a term that originates from some indigenous and Native American peoples, and is used to describe people who identify as having both a "masculine and feminine spirit".<ref name="LGBTQH">{{Cite web|url=https://lgbtqhealth.ca/community/two-spirit.php |publisher=LGBTQ Health|title=Researching for LGBTQ Health|accessdate=January 21, 2022}}</ref> The term itself has been attributed to Elder Myra Laramee, who proposed it in 1990 as a translation of the Anishinaabemowin term ''niizh manidoowag'': two spirits.<ref name="LGBTWH" /> However, the term is far older than that, and is considered to be more akin to a third gender.<ref name="ICT">{{Cite web|url=https://indiancountrytoday.com/archive/8-misconceptions-things-know-two-spirit-people|title=8 Things You Should Know About Two Spirit People - Indian Country Today|author=Enos, Tony|publisher=Indian Country Today|date=September 13, 20|accessdate=January 21, 2022}}</ref><ref name="NCAI">{{Cite web|url=www.ncai.org/policy-research-center/initiatives/Pruden-Edmo_TwoSpiritPeople.pdf|title=Two-Spirit People: Sex, Gender & Sexuality in Historic and Contemporary Native America|publisher=National Congress of American Indians Policy Research Center|date=2016|accessdate=January 21, 2022}}</ref>
 
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Since non-binary is an umbrella term for all genders falling outside of the gender binary, agender is often placed under this banner. However, this does not mean that all non-binary people are agender, as many still do experience gender whereas agender people do not.<ref name="Healthline: What Does It Mean to Be Agender?" /><ref name="PFLAG: National Glossary of Terms" />
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====Neutrois====
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{{Stub|section}}
   
 
===Controversy===
 
===Controversy===
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{{Stub|section}}
 
''If there has been a specific variety of this identity-phobic discourse that has led to discrediting it please detail that here. If there have been similar -phobic discourses around popular flags, it can also be documented in this section.''
 
''If there has been a specific variety of this identity-phobic discourse that has led to discrediting it please detail that here. If there have been similar -phobic discourses around popular flags, it can also be documented in this section.''
   
 
===Perceptions and discrimination===
 
===Perceptions and discrimination===
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{{Stub|section}}
Many transgender people transition physically through [[hormone replacement therapy]] (HRT) and/or surgeries to bring their bodies into alignment with their gender identity. However, not all people wish to, choose to, or have access to resources that would allow for this form of transition.<ref name="Nonbinary Gender Identities" /> [[Cisgender|Non-transgender]] people often overemphasize medical transitioning, but a trans person's identity is self-determined, not dependent upon procedures or appearance.<ref name="GLAAD Glossary: Transgender" /> In a 2018 survey, 52% of transgender people sought HRT or other medical care to help transition to their correct gender.<ref>{{Cite_web|url=https://www.goodtherapy.org/blog/can-nonbinary-people-experience-gender-dysphoria-022620197|title=Can Non-Binary People Expierence Gender Dysphoria?|author=Zawn Villenes, Good Therapy}}</ref>
 
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''This section focuses more on the specific kinds of discrimination and oppression that these people may face. Examples would be mentioning systematic transphobia and non-binary erasure on the page for agender, mentioning rates of mental health issues in this group, etc.''
 
For some, the desire to transition stems from their own gender dysphoria, referring to the experience of intense distress with the lack of alignment between body and identity. Dysphoria is not experienced by every trans person and it is not a necessary "symptom" to determine that somebody other than oneself is trans. However, because medical transitioning involves medical professionals, it often requires a diagnosis that includes dysphoria in its criteria.<ref name="Nonbinary Gender Identities" /> Dysphoria often begins in childhood, but some people first experience it after puberty.<ref name="What Is Dysphoria">{{Cite_web|url=https://www.psychiatry.org/patients-families/gender-dysphoria/what-is-gender-dysphoria|title=What Is Gender Dysphoria?|author=Psychiatry.org}}</ref>
 
 
In the 21st century, being transgender and advocating for transgender rights has been incorrectly viewed as a trend or a fad that will pass; however, it is documented that such a belief is a product of Western colonialism, and transgender people have always existed.<ref name="ACLU">{{Cite web |url=https://www.acluohio.org/en/news/transgender-people-have-always-existed |title=Transgender People Have Always Existed | date=2016-06-10 |author=Martens, Avery }}</ref> Western colonialism began around the 15th century at a time when European countries sought to increase their power through conquering and exploiting other nations and indigenous peoples. One of the many tactics of colonialism the enforcing of its culture and language on another. Western Colonialism was so widespread that by 1914, most nations in the world were colonized by European forces at some point.<ref name="National Geographic">{{Cite_web|url=https://www.nationalgeographic.com/culture/article/colonialism|title=Colonialism Facts and Information|author=Blakemore, Erin|date=2019-02-19|work=[https://www.nationalgeographic.com National Geographic]}}</ref> Western colonialism demonized anyone who did not fit in with [[cisnormativity]] and [[heteronormativity]], and enforced assimilation versus annihilation, which caused [[trans erasure]] in history. Before then, transgender individuals went by many different names in various cultures around the world, often with sacred and/or important positions in their societies.<ref name="Them">{{Cite web |url=https://www.them.us/story/colonialism-black-and-indigenous-people-gender-identity |title=Colonialism Still Affects How Black and Indigenous People See Gender |date=2021-08-18 |author=Omowale, Jendayi }}</ref> (See [[Transgender#History|History]] for more)
 
 
[[Gender essentialism]] and the [[gender binary]] introduced by Western colonialism still impacts the way transgender individuals are stigmatized as defiant/deviant. The stigma denies equal-opportunity to prosperity as it impacts every aspect of life, some just being: economic, financial and housing stability, having a familial or social support system and mental health.<ref name="HRC">{{Cite_web|url=https://reports.hrc.org/dismantling-a-culture-of-violence|title=Dismantling a Culture of Violence|author=Human Rights Campaign Foundation|partialdate=October 2021|work=[https://www.thehrcfoundation.org/ Human Rights Campaign Foundation]}}</ref>
 
   
 
==Media==
 
==Media==
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===Music===
''This section should be used to elaborate on the portrayal and representation of this identity in various forms of media, which can include a listing or links to various artists or movies, series, etc.''
 
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* Angel Haze - American rapper and singer who identifies as pansexual and agender.
 
===Literature===
 
*''George'' by Alex Gino
 
*''Rick'' by Alex Gino
 
 
===Television===
 
*[[w:c:pose-fx:pose|''Pose'']] &mdash; Multiple characters and cast members
 
*[[w:c:arrow:Supergirl|''Supergirl'']] &mdash; [[w:c:Nia Nal|Nia Nal]] (aka Dreamer)
 
 
===Public figures===
 
*Alexandra Billings
 
*Bex Taylor-Klaus
 
*Brian Michael Smith
 
*Carmen Rupe
 
*Chaz Bono
 
*Chella Man
 
*Daniela Sea
 
*Elliot Fletcher
 
*Elliot Page
 
*Ezra Furman
 
*Georgina Beyer
 
*Gia Gunn
 
*Gigi Goode
 
*Ian Harvie
 
*Jamie Clayton
 
*Janet Mock
 
*Jazz Jennings
 
*Jen Richards
 
*Kye Allums
 
*Laganja Estranja
 
*Mj Rodriguez
 
*Nicole Maine
 
*Rhys Ernst
 
*Silas Howard
 
*Tommy Dorfman
 
*Trace Lysette
 
 
==Notes==
 
<references group="note" />
 
   
 
==Resources==
 
==Resources==
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* [http://neutrois.com/ Neutrois] - a great resource for anyone who is or thinks they may be neutrois, agender, or genderless.
*[https://translanguageprimer.com The Trans Language Primer]—Online information resource for the community, its cohorts, and service providers
 
*[https://translifeline.org Trans Lifeline]—Peer support by trans people, for trans people (US and Canada)
 
*[https://transequality.org National Center for Transgender Equality]—Know Your Rights guides to legal rights in various situations, other self-help guides, information about various topics
 
   
 
==References==
 
==References==
 
{{Scroll|{{Reflist}}}}
 
{{Scroll|{{Reflist}}}}
 
[[Category:Gender identity]]
 

Revision as of 13:19, 21 January 2022

Agender people are people who do not identify as any gender,[1][2] though some define their gender experience more as being neither a man nor a woman. Whether or not the term applies is a personal decision and experience, as being agender is not the same experience for everyone identifying as such.[3] While agender is typically placed on the transgender and non-binary umbrella, this does not mean that all agender people also identify with either of those terms or necessarily transition physicially, legally, or socially.[4] Agender people can have any type of gender expression, and use any set of pronouns or no pronouns at all.[5] One's agender identity is not specific, or generally related to sexual orientation or assigned gender at birth.[3]

Etymology

The term "agender" is comprised of the prefix "a-", which comes from the Ancient Greek -, meaning "not" or "without",[6] and "gender". The literal meaning of the term agender is thus "without a gender".

Community

Agender Pride Day is observed each year on May 19, with the first time having been in 2017. As such, it is one of the newer LGBTQIA+ awareness days.[7]

History

While agender as an identity is not new, the word describing the gender experience, or lack thereof, only surfaced on the internet in 2000 on a forum called UseNet during a religious discussion with someone referring to God as being agender.[8] According to the Oxford English Dictionary, the term was used again on the same forum 5 years later, this time to refer to people,[9] and from then on, the term started to gain traction. It was used in a profile done by the New York Times of "Generation LGBTQIA",[10] and US history was made on March 10, 2017, when the Multnomah County Court of Oregon granted Patch a "General Judgment of Name and Sex Change", thus becoming the first, legally agender person in the US. The same judgment also allowed them to change names and become mononymous — meaning only having one name instead of a given name and a surname.[11]

Flag

The agender flag was created on February 18, 2014, by Salem, who identifies as an agender and panromantic demisexual with they/she pronouns.[12] An artist from New York, they created the flag at a time when Tumblr was seeing an influx of identity expressions, making it hard for people to distinguish the valid identities from the "online fads". Capitalizing on the momentem, Salem created the agender flag (among others)[13] to increase visibility for agender identities and reclaim their own identity.[12] The transgender flag served as a primary influence as Salem wanted to have a similar stripe pattern and symmetry.[13]

File:Agender pride flag.svg

This flag was created to increase visibility for agender people, as well as a way for the artist to reclaim their own identity.

The flag design features 7 horizontal stripes, from top to bottom: black, gray, white, green, white, gray, and black again. The black and white stripes represent the agender experience, the gray the demi-agender experience, and the green refers to agender being part of the wider non-binary community as those who identify outside of the gender binary.[4] While the monochrome on the flag is representative of a spectrum of internatl identities, ranging from people with a strong feeling of gender to those without, the green in the middle was deliberately chosen for being the invert of the shade of purple on the non-binary flag that refers to those who relate to the gender binary, as purple is a combination of pink and blue, the traditional female and male colors, thus highlighting that agender does not fall between the binary spectrum at all.[13]

File:Agender pride flag 4 stripes.svg

An hommage to the original flag was created in 2021.

While Salem's design remains the most widespread, more agender flags were created. In 2021, Mars created a four-striped homage to the original, using similar colors and meanings, though with a deliberately higher-contrast design and fewer stripes to emphasize the solidarity of agender people who may also be lesbian, gay, bisexual, non-binary, trans, ace, or any of the other sexual identities. By reducing the repetition of the colors, Mars sent out the message that "No matter what else we are, all agender people are wholly equally agender."[14]

Distinction

Genderless

Genderless and agender are often presented as synonyms,[3][15] and while there is a strong overlap between the experiences, they are distinct terms because genderless puts a much stronger emphasis on the gender experience being one of completely lacking a gender. As with agender people, whether or not genderless people choose to transition in any way—physically, legally, or socially—is entirely dependent on their own experience.[16][17]

Gender neutral

Gender neutral means "not gendered", which places it right within the meaning of agender, i.e. "without a gender". However, as opposed to agender, gender neutral is not a term used to describe people. This term is used to refer to language (such as pronouns or neutral greeting or job titles), locations (like bathrooms), or other aspects of society.[18]

Gender non-conforming

The difference between agender and gender non-conforming people lies in the fact that agender people generally experience a lack of gender whereas a gender non-conforming person is someone who does not (fully) conforms to the expectations around their gender that their society enforces. While some gender non-conforming people may identify as agender, many do not, and they simply do no follow the expected gender norms. This can out itself in the way they express themselves, the roles they assume, or any other aspect of their gender.[3]

Non-binary

Since non-binary is an umbrella term for all genders falling outside of the gender binary, agender is often placed under this banner. However, this does not mean that all non-binary people are agender, as many still do experience gender whereas agender people do not.[3][18]

Neutrois

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Controversy

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If there has been a specific variety of this identity-phobic discourse that has led to discrediting it please detail that here. If there have been similar -phobic discourses around popular flags, it can also be documented in this section.

Perceptions and discrimination

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This section focuses more on the specific kinds of discrimination and oppression that these people may face. Examples would be mentioning systematic transphobia and non-binary erasure on the page for agender, mentioning rates of mental health issues in this group, etc.

Media

Music

  • Angel Haze - American rapper and singer who identifies as pansexual and agender.

Resources

  • Neutrois - a great resource for anyone who is or thinks they may be neutrois, agender, or genderless.

References